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Indonesian-Swiss Intellectual Property Project – ISIP Phase 2

The objective of the second phase of the ISIP project is to strengthen the use of intellectual property rights in Indonesia in order to contribute to higher competitiveness, add more value to Indonesian products, and positively impact Indonesia’s economic development.

  

Project News

The ISIP project contributed to the publication of the book “Striking Patterns” (Univ. Zurich, 2016) with a chapter on ikats and Intellectual Property Rights (pdf 220 KB) presenting the findings of the project activity “Sikka Ikat”

 

In May 2016, the National Geographical Indications (GI) Seminar & Market Place in Jakarta, facilitated by ISIP, attracted over 800 visitors (experts, buyers, media and the general public). The event helped to initiate a positive dynamic and to popularise GIs throughout Indonesia.

 
Indonesia project
Indonesia project
Indonesia project
Indonesia project
Indonesia project
 
 

Project background and context

Indonesia project
The second phase of the ISIP project supports market access and a quality control of traditional products such as Ikat woven textiles of Flores.

The integration of Indonesia into the international system of intellectual property rights (IPRs) is well advanced. The country is a party to most – yet not all – important treaties relevant to IPRs, including the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS Agreement) since its accession to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) in 1995. While Indonesia’s legal and institutional framework in the field of IPRs is well developed, challenges still remain. As in many other emerging economies, institutional constraints continue to impede the effective enforcement of IPRs. Furthermore, the holders of IPRs have not yet fully exploited the potential of these rights. Both are partly the result of limited public awareness of IPRs. Promoting the use of those types of IPRs that allow Indonesia to capitalise on its internal strengths, such as geographical indications (GIs), or its creative industry, is of particular interest to the Government of Indonesia. The ISIP project was initiated at the request of the Indonesian Government to the Swiss Confederation, and its first phase was successfully implemented from 2012 to 2016. An effective IPR system in Indonesia is also in the interest of Switzerland. Only an efficient Indonesian intellectual property office (the DGIP) is able to provide solid protection for patents, trademarks and GIs of Swiss companies. The planned free trade agreement between Switzerland/EFTA and Indonesia underlines the importance of this emerging market. Due to clearly positive results of the first phase of ISIP, and ongoing need for support, all parties agreed on entering into a second phase of the project.

 

1 Why Indonesia? | 2 Our goals | 3 What we do | 5 Who benefits? | 6 Project Facts

 

 

Goals and objectives

While the core focus areas remain the same as in the first phase, the second phase puts more emphasis on making geographical indications economically sustainable, and on supporting Indonesia’s creative industry. Selected thematic areas of high relevance to Indonesia include:

  • Further support the intellectual property expertise of the DGIP in examining patent applications and preventing IP disputes;
  • Provide advice to the revision of IPR policy frameworks;
  • Strengthen the capacities of the DGIP to provide internal trainings and external information to IPR users;
  • Provide advice on the use of IPRs for exports of creative industry SMEs, in cooperation with BEKRAF;
  • Support producers of GI value chain products with tailor-made trainings on market access, quality control, and organisational development; and
  • Build capacities of Collective Management Organizations

 

1 Why Indonesia? | 2 Our goals | 3 What we do | 5 Who benefits? | 6 Project Facts

 

 

Activities

In light of the relatively advanced stage of Indonesia’s intellectual property system, the niche approach of the second phase of ISIP addressing specific needs and requests adds the most value and appears to be the best strategy for achieving sustainable results. The project provides specialised advice and support in selected areas where Switzerland is able to offer strong expertise and achieve a tangible impact. Within these thematic areas, the intervention strategy (activities) mainly consists of technical capacity building through training, workshops, and expert input, which is always lead by a national and an international consultant. These activities increase the capacity of the DGIP, BEKRAF, and other IP-related organisations in delivering professional services. Furthermore, the project supports the concrete implementation of GI activities in different Indonesian regions, e.g., Amed specialty salt in Bali, Ikat woven textiles in Flores, and Soe mandarins in Timor (see photos). The certification of these local specialty products with the GI logo is expected to increase the income of local producers. Thereby, the project also supports community development and product marketing activities.

 

1 Why Indonesia? | 2 Our goals | 3 What we do | 5 Who benefits? | 6 Project Facts

 

 

Alignment with Indonesia’s general development priorities

A strong and well-balanced intellectual property system encourages investment in modern technologies, the building of strong local brands and technological innovation, all of which are needed to make Indonesian companies more competitive internationally. The second phase of the ISIP project is aligned with the key socio-economic development priorities of the Government of Indonesia, in particular with the aims of modernising its industry and of narrowing the income gap between its rural and urban population.

 

1 Why Indonesia? | 2 Our goals | 3 What we do | 5 Who benefits? | 6 Project Facts

 

More Information and Contact

Reto Meili – ISIP Project Coordinator
Swiss Federal Institute of Intellectual Property – IPI
E-Mail | +41 31 377 72 71